How to use the verb μου αρέσει in Greek: a practical guide with 23 examples

When your friend Katerina calls to invite you over for one of those bubbly, heartwarming Greek get-togethers over lunch with her, she asks:

“Τι να φτιάξω; Τι σου αρέσει;” (What should I make? What do you like?)

You politely insist she doesn’t have to get into trouble, you just wanted to see her.

But, you know how Greeks are about food: Τhere’s no way she ‘ll let you starve, quite the opposite, really.

“Τι σου αρέσει” , λοιπόν; So, what do you like?

In your mind pops Katerina’s τυροπιτάκια, κρεατόπιτα, χωριάτικη σαλάτα, ντολμαδάκια, χαλβάς and all the lovely dishes she makes.

But foods and other nouns in Greek have, as you know, 3 grammar genders:

  • masculine

  • feminine

  • neuter

and 2 numbers:

  • singular and

  • plural.

… and confusion begins. The question now is:

How to use the verb “I like (something)” in Greek: μου αρέσει or μου αρέσουν?

Today’s guide will help you not only say what you like - or don’t like -  but also use this verb about things you like doing.

Let’s dive in:

the reason why it’s different

The difficulty of this seemingly simple verb is that it doesn’t start with a “regular” personal pronoun, e.g. εγώ as in any of the verbs you use, such as εγώ πηγαίνω, εγώ κοιμάμαι etc. , but with the pronoun’s genitive μου (in the case where you talk about yourself).

Then, the verb αρέσει is added, in 3rd person singular or in 3rd plural person αρέσουν:

μου + αρέσει / αρέσουν

Unlike other languages, English or French for example, the structure is similar to the Spanish “me gusta” or “me gustan”.

You don’t need to speak Spanish, obviously, but the little “trick” is that the structure of μου αρέσει / αρέσουν is closer to: “It pleases me / They please me” rather than to the English verb “I like”.

Which actually means this:

  • with 3rd person singular αρέσει, you talk about something in singular: μου αρέσει ο χυμός.

  • with 3rd person plural αρέσουν, you talk about something in plural: μου αρέσουν τα ζώα.

To talk about things you like, or like doing, the verb only changes in singular or plural, since it’s about the number of things, the nouns you like (or don’t like) or about an activity (more on this in a bit).

Simply put, you don’t need to change the ending of αρέσει as you do with other verbs - except from plural form αρέσουν.

If you’re a grammar jargon type, you’ve guessed that μου αρέσει is an impersonal verb, which is why you don’t need to conjugate it to talk about things you like.

The 2 questions you might have now:

#1 Okay, I get that the verb part depends on what follows (Yay! This is more than halfway through.) But what about the personal pronoun?

#2 Which form of the word that follows (noun) do I have to use? Nominative (ο, η, το), accusative (τον, την, το) or genitive (του, της, του) case?

Let’s look closely at the examples below.

  1. Μου αρέσει ο καφές. I like coffee.

  2. Μου αρέσουν τα ταξίδια στο εξωτερικό. I like trips abroad.

  3. Σου αρέσει η σοκολάτα. You (singular) like chocolate.

  4. Σου αρέσουν οι εκπλήξεις; Do you like surprises?

  5. Δεν της αρέσει το κρύο. She doesn’t like the cold.

  6. Της αρέσει απίστευτα αυτή η παραλία. She adores (unbelievably likes) this beach.

  7. Του αρέσει το τσάι. He likes tea.

  8. Του αρέσουν τα παραδοσιακά σπίτια. He likes traditional houses.

  9. Μας αρέσει το βιβλίο που διαβάζουμε. We like the book we read.

  10. Δεν μας αρέσουν οι καφετέριες με καπνό. We don’t like cafés with smoke (of cigarettes, where smoking is allowed).

  11. Σας αρέσουν τα κιμαδοπιτάκια; Do you like minced meat pies?

  12. Δεν σας αρέσει ο θόρυβος που είχε αυτό το σπίτι. You (plural) don’t like the noise this house had.

  13. Σας αρέσουν οι μεζέδες; Do you like mezes (plural)?

  14. Τους αρέσει πάρα πολύ ο χαλβάς που φτιάχνεις. They like a lot the halva you make.

  15. Δεν τους αρέσει η πολυκοσμία. They don’t like crowds.

  16. Δεν τους αρέσουν τα ηλεκτρονικά παιχνίδια. They don’t like computer/video games.

What do you notice?

Regardless of the noun - whether it’s one (ο θόρυβος) or many (τα κιμαδοπιτάκια), whether it’s in feminine (οι καφετέριες) or masculine (οι μεζέδες) - the personal pronoun depends on the person who likes or doesn’t like something.

And, you guessed it right: in all sentences, the nominative case has to be used with the articles ο, η, το and οι, οι, τα - depending of course on the grammatical gender.

To recap, the structure is:

μου + αρέσει / αρέσουν + nominative case

Now, off to the last part. How to say “I like this activity”?

Fortunately, this is much more straightforward: To form the sentence all you need is:

The personal pronoun of choice, e.g. μου and then:

μου αρέσει + να + verb in present tense*

Let’s see some examples:

  1. Μου αρέσει να τρέχω. I like to run.

  2. Σου αρέσει να λες ιστορίες; Do you like telling stories?

  3. Του αρέσει να διαβάζει μυθιστορήματα. He likes to read novels.

  4. Δεν της αρέσει να κοιμάται πολύ αργά. She doesn’t like sleeping very late.

  5. Μας αρέσει να μαγειρεύουμε με λίγο αλάτι. We like cooking with a little salt.

  6. Σας αρέσει να κολυμπάτε; Do you like swimming?

  7. Δεν τους αρέσει να δουλεύουν την Κυριακή. They don’t like working on Sunday.

*A grammar note: να + verb in present tense is a practical way to remember it. Grammatically, it’s the continuous subjunctive mood.

The first part μου αρέσει can be used in past tense (μου άρεσε) and future tense (θα μου αρέσει).

But the second part να + verb in present tense can’t be changed.

Next Step: Say it!

Now tell me, which Greek food you like? And which you don’t?
Or, as your friend would ask: Τι σου αρέσει;

Reply in the comments below!

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Happy Greek learning,

Danae