learn greek online

5 Ideas To Help You Refresh Your Greek Speaking Skills And Build Your Confidence

When Ana moved to Athens, she was excited. She couldn’t wait to meet new people, wander around the city, absorb every second of her new life there.

She was prepared to face the challenges: different language, culture, mentality. New habits, new rhythm and way of life.

Ana spoke some Greek already. She had met a few nice people she chatted with every day: “Καλημέρα, τι κάνετε;”

But within her first year in Greece, Ana realized - better: experienced - that daily speaking wasn’t a recipe; even if you follow all the steps from your course book, you won’t necessarily get it right.

refresh Greek speaking_alphabetagreek.png

Most of the times, it was difficult to catch up with fast pace, every day communication: at the grocery store, with her Greek friend on the phone or, the hardest of all, in a larger group of Greek speaking people.

She knew the grammar rules; but the rules kept slipping away. She knew the words; but the words kept not making sense if put together at a fast, natural speech speed.

Her friends switched to English. And, eventually, so did she.

Have you ever felt like Ana?

I sure did. When I spoke to my English speaking friends, I often found myself stumbling and mixing up words:

  • Words that look the same in the 2 languages, but have a completely different meaning

  • Words that sound alike

  • Tiny words, such as prepositions, that I couldn’t remember where to add them: before the verb, after the verb, between the two verbs?

  • Large words I didn’t remember how to pronounce

Some of my English speaking friends even spoke Greek, so switching to my language felt safe, but also disappointing: “Ugh, there goes my chance to practice”, I’d think.

If you ever felt like that too, here’s what I want you to know, when the words don’t come out easy:

You have every right to make mistakes, mispronounce words, mix up the meaning. Even if you know the grammar. Even if you understand what others say to you. Not just once, but a 100 times.

You have the right to feel overwhelmed, to get annoyed, to exclaim, even, that Greek is the hardest language (even if you don’t believe it).

You have the right to feel tired and make a pause from your learning. If you need it, do it. You’re not a language learning machine, you’re human.

But when your Greek heart calls you back again and you know that speaking Greek is still one of your priorities, then treat your speaking with care.

Here’s how to build your confidence again:

Create the circumstances to avoid another round of overwhelm about your speaking - at least for the next little while (because, well, life!).

And because I’m all about practical advice you can easily implement, here are 5 short and simple ideas:

  • Sing. If you’re into learning with music (it doesn’t work for everyone) learn the lyrics to your favourite Greek songs and sing along. Singing is not speaking (as in expressing yourself freely), but the rhythm and the flowing language through music are both a first step and a confidence booster when you want to hear yourself speaking Greek again.

  • Send a short voice message to wish something or just say hi to a friend or relative instead of a written message, on Messenger or Instagram. Prepare a bit if you want to, but aim for something short that doesn’t require lots of thinking or editing.

  • Chat with only one friend in person (online or offline) and ask them to chat in Greek only. The 1-1 interaction with someone you feel comfortable with is a safe space for shy or self-conscious learners who get quite disappointed by their mistakes, especially when they are in larger groups.

  • Join a short and practical conversation class or speaking program, online or offline or ask your teacher to set aside 10-15 minutes just to speak about something that interests you - outside the course book and the role play activities.

  • Make today a recording of yourself speaking, not more than 1-5 minutes. If you need help with “what should I be talking about?” ideas, you can sign up for the mini-speaking challenge: you’ll receive one short speaking prompt daily, for 3 days, plus a few words + phrases to get you started. At the end, you can send me your voice recording and receive a few ideas about how and what to improve. See how the challenge works, here.

Speaking in another language is a lot of work

And especially at the “in between” levels, where you know the basic grammar well enough but you still make mistakes, your self-confidence can be shaken.

When you’re past the basic vocabulary and you are longing for a chat in flawless Greek, it’s easy to become impatient, stressed out, and often disappointed and overwhelmed.

Remember though, that the learning journey has its ups and downs.

Sometimes you’ll celebrate and feel happy, other times you’ll stumble and feel disappointed.

But if you know you’re here to stay, start again, take action and use your recent experience to create resilience and perseverance.

Which idea are you going to try next for your speaking? Let me know in the comments!

Thank you for learning with me,

~ Danae

Why learning vocabulary through authentic texts transforms your learning - plus 10 Greek blogs to follow and enjoy

Imagine you’re sitting in your living room, a course book at hand, your pen and your notebook on the other.

Tomorrow’s lesson is approaching, but today you just don’t feel like repeating vocabulary that still finds a way to slip your mind.  

You sigh.

You daydream of a sunny day in your favourite place in Greece and you tell yourself to push some more; after all, who knows, you might actually need these words from your course book Unit.

Another sigh.

You just want to feel the satisfaction of using what you know in a nice discussion with your Greek friends.

I get it.

Taking the leap.

Many years ago, I spent a summer learning French on my own.

I had learned French as a child and now I was somewhere around the “dreaded” pre-Intermediate / Intermediate level, where basic things were too easy, even boring, but authentic texts or the radio seemed to me so scary and incomprehensible.

You see, I was about to spend one year in France. I was eager and as motivated as can be to finish the heavy grammar book, fill in as many activities I could, note down every single word I didn’t know - and learn them. All.

While I was in France, I started a French class for International students. The idea was the same; to fill out the grammar activities, to note down, repeat and learn the vocabulary from the texts I had to read in my course book.

This time, it didn’t work. I decided to drop the class.

I went ahead and enrolled in literature and history courses for French students (and, naturally, aimed to savour every moment I’d spend in my favourite country).

Was I out of my mind for diving so deep into the language?

A bit, since I failed one of the literature classes badly and this had an impact on my grades at the end of the semester.

But looking back at it - it’s been 15 years since that time - here’s what I wanted to share with you:

I still remember the absolute miracle of realizing I could understand the assigned novel (the Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) and what’s more, enjoying my read and being able to talk about it. In French!

What I felt was not just joy, but happiness.

Sure, I failed to write a proper essay. Sure, it took me a very, very long time to finish that novel.

But the fact that I could recall some great new words and actually talk about a whole book that previously seemed an intimidating task for my level, this was something I never forgot.

Now -  back to you:

Do you feel happiness when you learn Greek?

Do you feel you study with things and material you love?

Do you feel interested in what you read and eager to use the new words in your next conversation with a Greek or do you often yawn or even get stressed right in the middle of an exercise you feel like you “should” finish?

I’m not to say that you should ditch your course book. Of course not.

But since you’re here today, it means that you anticipate the moment where you understand what Greeks read, say or listen to.

The moment you talk with them about things that matter to you and find common topics to talk about.

The moment you make connections.

It’s true, you might feel like I did, intimidated by authentic texts (newspaper, magazines, blogs, fiction and non-fiction reads).

Maybe your perfectionism shouts at you : “Hey, you’ve been learning for (insert the number that applies to you) years now and you can’t even understand 30% of what you read!”

Maybe you glimpse at such a read and you feel afraid that you’ll lose your motivation, that next time you’ll look away, completely disheartened.

I understand how not understanding everything might be terrifying and off putting.

But, eventually, so is repeating over and over, condemning yourself not to move past your struggles.

And so is not being a bit adventurous and playful about your learning.

So, go ahead and take the leap:

  • Explore a new book a page at a time.

  • Listen to lyrics you think you’ll understand after playing the song again and again.

  • Follow a Greek blog and read an interesting article (more on this, in a minute!).

Because alongside your course book and dictionary, there is a whole world of language and culture awaiting for you.

And if studying Greek feels something like “I should finish all the Units in the book” (which sounds a bit like a chore) I’d like to shake things up a bit for you.

Are you ready?

Below you’ll find some popular Greek blogs ( and a few online newspapers/magazines).

There are 10 different themes:

  1. Travel

  2. Nutrition & Recipes

  3. History Facts

  4. Books

  5. Music & Concerts

  6. Sports

  7. Politics

  8. Greek language

  9. Nature & Environment

  10. Healthy living

Here’s what to do:

  • Click on the one that interests you the most. Find an article that you’d like to read

  • Pick a length that feels right for you (1 paragraph, 3 paragraphs or the whole thing)

  • Then, use this magic little Chrome extension, which is called Readlang. Readlang replaces nicely a dictionary when you read online. (In case you don’t use a Chrome browser, skip this section and read below).

How Readlang works:

  • You add it on Chrome.

  • You sign up for a free account (there is a paid version but here I show you how to use the free version).

  • You start by opening a webpage.

  • Then you highlight words (unlimited number) or sentences (10 per day) which you can later use as flashcards, too!

Here you can find tutorials about the extension. And below there’s a short tutorial (5 minutes) I made specifically for the Greek learners, to show you how to use it with a Greek text:

The blog post used in this tutorial is written by Maria Kofou and you can find it here: Δύο ημέρες στη Μπολόνια - Enjoy!

If Chrome is not the browser you use, then Google Translate will probably do the trick, but not just as nicely since there are often many mistakes.

Now, remember, this exercise is all about finding what you really enjoy reading and talking about.

Even with Readlang (or another translation tool), don’t tell yourself you should understand everything. You have the right not to.

What to do next?

After reading, comes the talking! Here’s how to make sure you don’t stop yourself at the reading part. It’s well worth it, believe me:

  1. Record yourself talking about your opinion and your thoughts about what you’ve just read (1-3 minutes)

  2. Note down any extra words you realized you needed to know when you did the recording (using Readlang or another translation tool)

  3. Record yourself again using your notes if needed. The second time gives you a sense of progress, as you immediately use what you just learned. What do you think? How was it?

  4. Share with me and other like-minded Greek language enthusiasts your experience in our small and friendly community. I can’t wait to hear all about it and give you some more ideas. (optional, but highly recommended!)

  5. Speak more & improve your Greek: Join Greek Recorder, the 3 - Week Online Greek Speaking Program where you learn 60 new words + phrases, speak more with the help of short speaking prompts and receive personalized feedback from me.

Did You Like This Article?

Get more of my best learning tips plus learning offers only for Greek language enthusiasts (with a bit of a sunshine, too) here:

Happy Greek learning,

~ Danae


Recommended for you:

The 5 Best From The Blog For 2018

Writing on a blog means reaching out, sharing with a community the same love, the same μεράκι.

It’s not about keeping all that you know for yourself; on the contrary, it’s about sharing it freely with the people who know the same love, who get the passion for all the beautiful things a language and a culture represent.

So, for one more year, I feel grateful and happy for being able to share with you this blog.

Below, you’ll find the 5 most loved articles of 2018.

These are articles about expressions and everyday phrases, about finding smart ways to focus and improve your speaking, about common grammar errors you might be making as you speak, while the conversation keeps going.

This list couldn’t include some newer articles that didn’t have the chance to be read as much. You might also find you have a different preference.

But I think this “tradition” is a nice way to remember some of the more “technical” aspects of language (such as the ever confusing Simple and Future tenses, most particularly, the Future Tense) or to find new inspiration and smart ways to spruce up your speaking with the use of a very simple tool you already have with you.

Let’s add some suspense and start the other way round, with the number 5:

#5

A New Route To Speaking Better Greek: 5 Simple And Steady Steps

This article is not about more course books. Or more activities.

If you crave to communicate with locals and feel good about it - but you often stumble after every other word, then keep reading.

You wouldn’t find the “fast, fun and easy” magic recipe for that in this article.

When I wrote it, I was simply eager to share with you an extremely simple way to start speaking, get feedback (even when you learn on your own!) and learn all this new vocabulary to use in actual conversations.

Sounds like magic, but it’s much simpler than that - no wands involved! Read about it here.

#4

Do You Make These 10 Errors In Greek?

This blog post was written after I made the same error for the millionth time (in English). I guess I secretly wished someone had written something similar for me.

You don’t have to be a beginner in Greek; the examples will help you avoid these very common errors you probably make again and again.

In fact, more advanced students make these errors too, especially in long phrases with more complex vocabulary and meaning.

And because you know I love explanations as opposed to “recipes”, you’ll also find why they are said this way and why it matters. Click here to read it.

#3

How To Use The Verb Γίνομαι : 18 Tangible Examples To Apply Right Away

Hmm. The verb γίνομαι.

Yes, we use this verb a lot.

And yes it causes tons of trouble because it doesn’t translate the same in other languages (if it does translate the same in your language, though, let me know, this will be fascinating to know and discuss).

Why should you care to get it right?

Apart from the obvious vocabulary related reasons, it will help you understand what the other person means when they use this verb in a number of different occasions.

You will also add some handy expressions in your speaking that make you sound more natural and avoid awkward silences. Find the article here.

#2

54 Short But Mighty Everyday Words And Phrases

This blog post is a long list, divided in several “themes” to help you use some of the most common phrases Greeks say in various situations.

I had lots of fun writing it!

You’ll also read about how to learn and use these phrases (hint: memorizing the whole list is definitely not included).

#1

How To Use The Future Tenses In Greek

And here we are to number 1.

This was the first post of 2018 and I do like it a lot.

Why? Because it felt good to untangle this thread of a grammar tense that appears to be causing so much trouble to learners.

Go ahead and learn or revise here the subtle or not so subtle differences between Simple and Future Continuous and then use them right away to say out loud your resolutions (or plans and projects) for the new year. Better, share them with me or in our small and friendly Facebook community!

A last note before the end of the year:

I’d like to thank you for coming along to this Greek language journey during the past year (and before that, if you happen to be reading the blog for quite a while).

I always appreciate your support and I thank you for sharing the love for the Greek language.

I wish you Καλές Γιορτές or a Happy Break and a wonderful New Year ahead.

~ Danae


Recommended for you: